________________ CM . . . . Volume VIII Number 10 . . . . January 18, 2002

cover Rachel Captures the Moon.

Richard Ungar.
Toronto, ON: Tundra Books, 2001.
32 pp., cloth, $18.99.
ISBN 0-88776-505-X.

Subject Heading:
Jews-Folklore

Grades 1-4 / Ages 6-9.

Review by Catherine Hoyt.

*** /4

excerpt:

"I know!" said Sarah the Weaver, the next day. "What the Moon really desires is to be warm. I will weave it a fine blanket. The moon will be so impressed that surely it will come down from the sky. When it does, I will wrap it so well in the blanket that it will not be able to escape!" A perfect plan, everyone agreed.

image Richard Ungar has adapted this story from Chelm Captures the Moon, by Samuel Tenenbaum. Ungar's choice to have little Rachel save the day is a good one. Her use of common sense shows that often a child can see a simple solution to a complex problem.

     The people of Chelm love the moon, and its disappearance each day leaves them feeling sad. The villagers decide to capture the moon so they will be able to gaze upon it anytime they chose, day or night. Many of the villagers try their own special plans to entice the moon out of the sky. The Carpenter uses a ladder. The Cook uses a special stew. Musician uses beautiful music. The Weaver uses an enormous blanket. The Fisherman uses a net. All of their attempts fail miserably. The village is about to give up hope. Then little Rachel has a plan, but the villagers scoff at the idea that a child could achieve success where they have all failed. With the help of a rain barrel, Rachel shows the adults how to capture the moon. All agree that it is the most beautiful moon ever.

     This author/illustrator uses watercolour and coloured pencil on paper to artfully depict this period village in his first picture book. The characters and village come alive with Ungar's vibrant choice of colour.

     Rachel Captures the Moon will be a nice choice for fable themed programs. This adapted story is a suggested purchase for school and public libraries.

Recommended.

As the result of an exciting move, Catherine Hoyt is now the Reference Librarian at the Nunavut Legislative Library in Iqaluit, Nunavut. However, she enjoys volunteering at the local public library in the newest capital in Canada.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.

Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364

NEXT REVIEW | TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THIS ISSUE - January 18, 2002.

AUTHORS | TITLES | MEDIA REVIEWS | PROFILES | BACK ISSUES | SEARCH | CMARCHIVE | HOME