Alumni Profiles
eno image Veronica Eno
Year of graduation: 2004
Current Position: Development Manager, Harvard Developments Inc., Winnipeg

What do you do in your current job?
I am the Development Manager for "Seasons", overseeing the implementation of a major mixed use development in southwest Winnipeg. My role includes coordination among team members from leasing, legal, construction, finance and marketing. As Development Manager, I am involved in the site from concept to completion.

Why did you choose to study urban planning?
I chose planning because of its broad nature. It considers inputs from a wide range of other professions and it can be applied to a wide range of career paths. I have classmates and colleagues who have gone on to focus on real estate and land development, urban design, social planning, research, housing, etc.

What advice do you have for those considering a career in planning?  
I would encourage students to try a bit of everything. Learn something about areas you aren't interested in. Be open to work experience that isn't in your preferred area of practice - it can give you a more complete perspective.

Why study in Winnipeg?
The Planning Department at U of M has a close relationship with local professionals. Having opportunities to interact with planners from many different sectors adds value to the classroom and studio projects. It’s one of the benefits of being in a city with a small town feel.
   
Segal Image Ryan Segal
Year of graduation: 2015
Current Position: Junior Planner, MMM Group, Winnipeg  

What do you do in your current job?

I get to work with a great team of planners on a variety of projects including: developing and implementing public engagement and stakeholder consultation, programs, assisting on land development projects (including rezoning, subdivision, variance, and conditional use applications), conducting market studies, and creating and reviewing community plans, development plans, secondary plans, and zoning by-laws.  

How did your planning degree at U of M prepare you for your career?
The U of M City Planning program prepared me to work collaboratively, quickly and creatively. The program was incredibly multidisciplinary, and the coursework and hands-on studio projects allowed me to experience a variety of different planning fields and points of view. The opportunity to work with urban, rural and Indigenous communities and organizations was especially invaluable.  

What advice do you have for those considering a career in planning?
While I am quite early into my career, I think it is important to be constantly curious -- ask lots of questions, research everything, and enjoy learning new things.

Why study in Winnipeg?
I am always amazed at how many kind, talented, intelligent, creative, and generous people I meet on a daily basis. For me, Winnipeg's rich history, and exciting arts, culture and design communities that make it a great place to study and live.
   
Steves Image  Greg Steves
Year of graduation: 2001
Current Position: Executive Director, Residential Tenancy Branch, Office of Housing and Construction Standards, Government of BC  

What do you do in your current job?
In my current job, I am responsible for administering the Residential Tenancy Act, and for overseeing an administrative tribunal to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants.  My office receives over 22,000 applications for dispute resolution annually and issues approximately 16,000 decisions.  In addition, we respond to over 200,000 phone calls each year.  Prior to this appointment, I was the Executive Director of Housing Policy.  

How did your planning degree at U of M prepare you for your career? 
My planning degree gave me the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed to review, analyze and find solutions for complex urban policy problems.  The curriculum in the City Planning program is intentionally designed to encourage diversity in perspective, which I found very useful when starting my career with the public service.     

Why did you choose to study urban planning?
During my undergraduate degree in geography I was drawn to urban issues, specifically related to neighbourhood change and transition.  Studying urban planning seemed to be the logical next step to take in order to gain a deeper understanding of urban change and preserving the characteristics and values of neighborhoods during periods of significant transition or renewal.   

What advice do you have for those considering a career in planning? 
Be open about what you what types of work you are willing to undertake as you start your planning career.  I always envisioned I would work in development consulting, but when I finished school the first job I got was in housing policy.  I saw it as a transitional job while I found something else, but I quickly discovered the analytical and research skills I honed while studying urban planning were perfectly matched to my job as a senior policy analyst.  Using the knowledge and skills I gained at U of M, I have been able to lead the development of the Government of BC’s Housing Strategy both in 2006 and 2014.  Housing Matters BC has a profound impact on urban policy and is heralded as the most progressive housing strategy in Canada.