Margaret Avison:

An Inventory of Her Papers at the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections

Inventory prepared by Margaret Calverley; updated in 1990 by Lewis St. George Stubbs
University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections
Winnipeg, Manitoba
(1990)

Finding aid encoded by Julianna Trivers (August 2002)
Finding aid written in English.

Revision History

  • July 26, 2005 - MSS 64 (A.90-11, A.96-23) converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by v1to02.xsl (sy2003-10-15).


Collection Summary

Repository:
University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections
Elizabeth Dafoe Library, Winnipeg, Manitoba

Creator:
Margaret Avison

Title:
Margaret Avison fonds

Dates:
1935-1996

Quantity:
0.84 m of textual records

Identification:
MSS 64

Language
English.

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Biography of Margaret Avison

Margaret Avison was born in Galt, Ontario in 1918, the daughter of a Methodist minister. She moved to Regina with her family in 1920, and then to Calgary a few years later. The Avisons returned to Ontario in about 1930, to Toronto where Avison attended high school, and entered Victoria College, University of Toronto in 1936. When she completed her B.A. in English in 1940, she was already a published poet as her poem “Gatineau” had appeared in the Canadian Poetry Magazine the previous year. Avison had a wide and varied professional career that commenced when she worked as a file clerk at North American Life Insurance (1940-42) and, for a few months, proofreader at Gage Publishing. Avison then worked ate the Canadian Institute of International Affairs – Information Service (1943-45) where she edited a publication called “The Nations Have Declared,” about documents issued by the United Nations. After the war she moved on to the University of Toronto to a position in the Registrar’s Office, and then in the Library (1946-1954).

In 1951, Avison’s History of Ontario , a textbook for use in high schools was published. She was awarded a Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Grant in 1956, so she spent 8 months in the United States writing poetry and attending creative writing classes at the universities of Chicago and Indiana. Following this she undertook freelance work editing, indexing, as well as ghostwriting a book entitled A Doctor’s Memoirs . Her first book of poetry, Winter Sun was published in 1960, and won her the Governor-General’s Award.

The year 1963 marked a major milestone in Avison’s life. She had drifted from her Methodist religious upbringing since her young adulthood; early in 1963 she converted to the Christian faith. During that same year her father died, so Avison’s mother moved to Toronto where she would live with Avison until a few months before her death in 1985 at the age of 102.

Deeply moved by the Hungarian Uprising of 1956, Avison undertook the translation of eight poems to The Plough and the Pen: Writings from Hungary 1930-1956 , published in 1963. The work was edited by Illona Duczynska and Karl Polanyi and brought recognition to many of the great 20th century Hungarian poets. The following year The Research Compendium was published. This volume consisted of précis, written by Avison, of theses by students in the School of Social Work at the University of Toronto.

In 1963 Avison returned to the University of Toronto for graduate work, writing her M.A. thesis on “Byron and the Newspapers” examining how the style of Don Juan reflected the new journalism of Byron’s day. She began doctoral studies in 1964, but never earned her doctorate, as she did not write a thesis. The Dumbfounding , her second book of poetry was published in 1966. From 1966-1968 she taught at Scarborough College, University of Toronto. During this time Avison also volunteered at a Presbyterian mission called Evangel Hall, where she went on to work as a women’s worker until 1973. Avison then spent eight months as writer-in-residence at the University of Western Ontario, after which she took a position in the CBC Radio Archives. After 1978 she returned to her charitable work, working as a secretary for the Mustard Seed Mission. This year also saw the appearance of her third book of poetry, sunblue , which was the product of her profound religious convictions.

In 1986 Avison retired from the Mustard Seed Mission. She received her second Governor-General’s Award in 1990 for No Time , which had been published the previous year. An anthology of her work entitled Margaret Avison: Selected Poems was published in 1991 and contains selections from previous volumes interwoven with new material and ‘adaptations’ of poems by the Hungarian poets Gyula Illyes and Ferenc Juhasz, from the literal translations by Illona Duczynska. In 1994, A Kind of Perseverance was published, consisting of two lectures delivered at the annual Pascal Lectures on Christianity and the University, at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. The lectures describe the tensions she experienced when trying to live out her Christian values in secular society, specifically within the university setting. A further book of poetry, Not Yet but Still , was published in 1997. In 2002, her book of poetry Concrete and Wild Carrot (2002) published by Brick Books won the prestigious Griffin Poetry Prize. One of the poems from the manuscript of Concrete and Wild Carrot was published in The Presbyterian Record and won a Canadian Church Press Award for 2000. From 2003-2005, The Porcupine's Quill published Always Now: The Collected Poems, Volumes One to Three. In 2006 her book of poetry Momentary Dark published by McLelland & Stewart won the Griffin Poetry Prize. Avison had two books published post-humously: Listening (2009) and I Am Here and Not Not-There, an autobiography (2009) .

Apart from her two Governor-General’s awards, Avison’s contribution to Canadian literature has been recognized in the bestowal of honorary degrees from Acadia University (1983), York University (1985), and Victoria University (1988). Avison was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1985.

She died in 2007.

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Scope and Contents of the Papers

The initial collection consists of several hundred unpublished poems written by Margaret Avison between 1935 and the late 1970s. A later accession received in 1996 adds correspondence from various literary associates & covers the late 1950s into the mid 1990s. In several instances other writers & poets send samples of their work for Avison's comments. There is a lengthy correspondence between Avison and the American poet Fredrick Bock. The Collection includes two thesis about the works of Margaret Avison and several of her unpublished essays & poems.

The 2001 accrual contributes photographs, audiotapes, to the existing fonds, as well as material relating to Avison’s work such as worksheets, manuscripts, published copies, and reviews. It also includes correspondence from the 1980s to 2001, material relating to the honours and awards that she has received, and lectures and readings. This accrual contains Avison’s Bible study notes created from 1967 to 2001.

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Organization of the Papers

This collection is organized into 11 series.

  • I. UP TO THE END OF HIGH SCHOOL 1935-1936
  • II SUMMER '36 - 1939-40
  • III. 1939-40 to 1952
  • IV. 1953 to January, 1963
  • V. SINCE JANUARY 4, 1963
  • VI. UNDATED & UNPUBLISHED POEMS [ca. 1970-1990].
  • VII. UNDATED & UNPUBLISHED ESSAYS [ca. 1970-1990].
  • VIII.CORRESPONDENCE & DRAFTS FROM OTHER WRITERS 1985-1996
  • IX. LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE 1960-1995
  • X. MATERIAL RELATING TO FREDRICK BOCK 1957-1995
  • XI. THESES ABOUT MARGARET AVISON 1986-1994

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Restrictions on Use

a) Open to all;

b) Quotations of excerpts allowed but no unpublished poem by, or any item of correspondence to or from, the donor may be published in full;

c) All quotations are to provide the source and to convey Margaret Avison's judgement that the piece is unpublishable;

d) Any publishing in full must wait until twenty years after the author's death;

e) Use of the collection is on terms of use placed by this Department;

f) It is the user's responsibility to abide by all Canadian copyright legislation as amended by Parliament from time to time.

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Custodial History

The collection was donated to the University of Manitoba in February 1990 after a series of meetings between the author and Dr. Richard E. Bennett, Head of the Department of Archives and Special Collections. Margaret Calverley, a graduate student at Victoria College in Toronto, had physical possession of the papers -- with Margaret Avison's consent -- until the final transfer to the University. A second accession A.96-23 arrived in 1996 and was designated Cultural Property by the National Archives Appraisal Board in 1997.

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Other Finding Aids

A.01-22; A.03-61 (PC 151, TC97)

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Detailed Description of the Collection

I. UP TO THE END OF HIGH SCHOOL 1935-1936

Compiled by Margaret Calverley

NOTE: Bibliographical information is given for all poems which have been published. The main source consulted was the bibliography compiled by Francis Mansbridge (see Kent, "Lighting up the terrain': The Poetry of Margaret Avison, pp.151-212). The following abbreviations are used for volumes of Avison's work:

sunblue ... sun

Winter Sun ... WS

The Dumbfounding ... Dumb

Winter Sun / The Dumbfounding ... WS/D

BoxFolder
11 UP TO THE END OF HIGH SCHOOL 1935-36
BoxFolder
11 1. A Freckle

"A freckle she sat on the rim of the sun"

1 2. The Music of the Waves

"The thunder of thousands of worlds gone by"

1 3. The God of the Storm

"The grey of the sea meets the grey of the sky"

1 4. My Holiday

"Running through the forest green"

1 5. Vespers

"Did you ever take a ramble when the twilight hour has come"

1 6. In Autumn

"Tell me, what could be so lovely as our Nature in the fall"

1 7. Which?

"Oh! you tiny fairys dancing in among the tree" [sic]

1

[#1-59 are from the scrapbook, "To Aunt Elva, Christmas, 1930"]

[#8-22 are inserted in the scrapbook and are clippings from The Globe and Mail]
BoxFolder
11 8. Nature's Calendar [Oct.19, 1929, age 11]

"I have to use a calendar, the days and weeks weeks to show, But when it comes to seasons Then Nature lets me know"

1 9. Christmas Eve [age 11]

"Packed the snow by many feet"

1 10. Charon [May 7, 1932, age 13]

"God of currents swift and rushing"

[#11-22 are published under the pseudonym, "Willamac"]
BoxFolder
11 11. The Quest [Feb.17, 1933]

"He had clutched at it when its first frail rays"

1 12. Milya, Little Worker [June 10, 1933]

"When the humming and the drumming Of a new existence coming"

1 13. The Farm - Before Breakfast

"Warm sun upon the woodpile"

1 14. Night Driving

"The whine of great tires on the hard, black road"

1 15. Mosquitoes

"A straggly legged mosquito, A speckled, big, fat fellow Had squatted on my elbow."

1 16. Drowsiness

"Deep, warm quiet, and a soft armchair"

1 17. Depression! [Nov.25, 1933]

"The heavy streets are glistening and grey"

1 18. Black [Feb.10, 1934]

"The big waves foam and run and break"

1 19. The Street Lamp's Soliloquy [Dec.23, 1933]

"Oh, it is splendid to be a little corner street lamp and Christmas Eve!" [sic] [short prose piece]

1 20. Sleepless [June, 1934]

"Left side, right side, heat infernal"

1 21. Some Call it Fame [Prize essay in the Nancy Durham Contest, Oct.20, 1934, age 16]

"A Statesman! A leader chosen by democracy!" [prose satire]

1 22. Icicles [age 16]

"A knot of icicles on the eave"

[#23-25 are clippings from "The Hermes" [Humberside Collegiate], 1932]
BoxFolder
11 23. To An Apple-Core

"Poor ugly, shrivelled, useless, withered thing"

1 24. The Prairie

"The grassy plain, in grey monotony"

1 25. An Argument for Joy

"They call this earthly world a vale of tears" [end of inserts]

1 26. Pleading with Dame December [Dec, 1930]

"Is it Autumn? - is it winter?"

1 27. The Funeral of Autumn

"The sky was draped in mourning"

1 28. Untitled

"'Twas over the crown of the moonlit"

1 29. Christmas Eve [Christmas, 1929]

[same as #9 - here in handwriting]

1 30. The Man in the Moon (Bruce Beach, 1930)

"The Man in the moon is a carefree old fellow"

1 31. The Close of Day [June, 1926]

"The trees are rocking the birds to rest"

1 32. Blueberry Picking [July, 1926]

"Straw hat is pulled on curly head"

1 33. Undercurrent [ The Globe and Mail , July 20, 1935]

"O earth, so dazzled with immensity"

1 34. A Tribute to Mother

"'Twas eventide; the child to worship knelt"

1 35. An Easter Prayer

"A trial short - a crown of thorns - raving, sneering mob"

1 36. Fun

"The grass lies green, the trees are grey"

1 37. Beyond the Mist

"April is come! the world awakes" [poem crossed out]

1 38. A Spring Jubilance

"The wild wind of March sweeps in force o'er the plains"

1 39. The Trojan Princess's Defiance

"The great man ceased - 'Oh let her grace begin'"

1 40. Drought

"Master Waterworks Commander stepped in haste up to a cloud"

1 41. Untitled [mid-high school]

"Oh if I were influencial [sic]

It would be quite providential

For the city of Toronto"

1 42. Friendless youth

"Disconsolate, even despairing of life and its issues"

1 43. Life Without Hope of Immortality

"A gasp - a sigh - the bated breath -"

1 44. Little Star Prilly

"Little Star Prilly sat up in her bed"

1 45. A Miracle

"The world is full of common, open things"

1 46. Daddy

"A minister's a solemn kind of man"

1 47. The Cry of the Indolent

"Lord, give to me sweet death and give it soon"

1 48. The Brook

"The morning breaks in smiles o'er all the land"

1 49. An Autumn Drizzle

"The skies are leaden - forbidding"

1 50. Greek Influence in (Jewish Hist) [mid-high school essay]

"To understand the measure and nature of Greek influence"

1 51. Untitled [written on a page within the essay]

"This is the little lonely nook where the tears of the wild land dwell"

1 52. Untitled [late high school]

"The rush of the clear dard, blue and deep"

1 53. Untitled

"Pallidly bleak is the surface of things"

1 54. Guatineau [sic] [insert]

"There is a rock at the river edge" [same as "Gatineau." Acta Victoriana [Victoria College, University of Toronto], 64, No.2 (Dec,1939), frontispiece.

Reprint in Canadian Poetry Magazine , 4, No.3 (Dec, 1939), p.19.]

1 55. The City's Nightfall

"Gusts from the east sigh fitfully. The quietude is grey."

1 56. Untitled

"Oh heavy twilight gloom oh huddled city there"

1 57. Untitled

"Wind, an October wind and clean deep sky"

1 58. Untitled

"The heavy streets are glistening and grey"

1 59. A list of birds Avison saw on outings in 1934.
1 60. Some untitled fragments:

"But it was plain that if the wheel should flip [sic?]"

"Man must have lived - must live on when he dies"

" Shere - circle - spiral on & on & on" [sic]

"A baby with a Personality"

END OF SCRAPBOOK
BoxFolder
11 61. Gotterdammerung? Thein Einhert

"The kettle simmered. The scarlet sunwarm smell Of red geraniums

1 62. Two boys

"'Where have you found this queer

Immaculate smile?' The wind"

1 63. Untitled

"When cats flatten on fences"

1 64. Untitled

"What do you hear when the bells ring"

1 65. Untitled

"We walk over the minutes"

1 66. Coast Camp

"We rode along a forest track"

1 67. Untitled

"Under the onslaught of the sun"

1 68. Untitled

"Tow my boatdonkey"

1 69. Incongruesome or Art in our time [last word?]

"Tonight I have no taste for the dull red moist secret place of sleep"

1 70. Optional [on back of #69. Handwritten draft of that in The Canadian Forum , Jan. 1943, p.307.]

"You do not obscure the skyline

With geometric stone"

1 71. Break of Day

"The wind it was that woke him"

1 72. Untitled

"The traveller brought treasures"

1 73. Untitled

"Troy passed away in one high funeral gleam" [Avison quotes this line in her review of Yeats's Collected Poems in The Canadian Forum , (Feb. 1951), p.261. It is unclear if this line is to stand alone, or if it introduces the following stanza which begins: "I called my battle breaking men."]

1 74. Spring: Decorators

"The painters left their scaffolds bare"

1 75. ALL THE PROPRIETIES ARE CRACKED LIKE WALNUTS IN THE BEEFY FIST OF THE BOURGEOUS APOCALYPSE

"All these things Are; Being -- I see it void In a small globule of blue lumined flame"

1 76. Naomi in the City

"The sunflat Sunday hours"

1 77. Archimedes

"It was a steep street in an eggshell morning sky"

1 78. Sound and Fury

"He shouted in the morning at the lifting of the snow"

1 79. For a Theme

"Even in the early days came rumours of the singer"

1 80. A measure of mush to a quasi-jesus

"Does it seem strange that I should want

to tell a story, distantly,

along the golden paths of evening?"

1 81. Untitled

"Do we fight for the things we cherish"

1 82. PASSAGE

"Bowen looked over his shoulder"

II SUMMER '36 - 1939-40
BoxFolder
12 1. Untitled

"Thin stands the sapling"

2 2. The Hanging of Steven [19 pages]

"They would say: 'That was a curious dream.'"

2 3. Untitled

"They roll down the cliffs and into the sea"

2 4. SCRAP DURING A DULL LECTURE

"We would experiment with Death" [poem crossed out]

2 5. They did not choose...

"They did not choose that they will not relinquish"

2 6. Untitled [5 pages]

"These girls laugh easily"

2 7. Untitled

"The waxen hands that lift and bear away"

2 8. Morning Piece

"There were seven stars in the morning sky"

2 9. Plaque for a Museum

"There is an inland river"

2 10. Untitled

"The woman mouthing hymns can understand"

2 11. Untitled

"The sky is not a drought for us"

2 12. The simple horizontal [ The Book of Canadian Poetry . Ed. A.J.M. Smith. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1943, p.428.]

"The simple horizontal

Is a lie dull eyes create"

2 13. Geography of the secret

"The places where things grow"

2 14. A moral tale

"The pantrymaid that chopped the chives"

2 15. Untitled

"The rainsweet grey of this forgotten morning"

2 16. The Spending of the Seed [originally, No Graven Image]

"The mourning murderer-sweetheart now"

2 17. August Afternoon

"The long striped afternoon moves carelessly"

2 18. Untitled

"Gregory was handsome in a tweed sort of way"

2 19. Untitled

"I woke to find my body" [poem crossed out]

2 20. The foghorn...

"The foghorn like a grey stone wall"

2 21. Coda and variations

"The evening ended with a game of dominoes"

2 22. GEOMETAPHYSICS [ Poetry [Chicago], 70 (Sept. 1947), pp.318-19.]

"The earth was once a circle-stage"

2 23. Yarely then

"The doom we now invoke"

2 24. The iconoclasts [ Ibid ., pp.319-20]

"The dervish dancer on the smoking steppes"

2 25. Reflection on Art, Industry, and Politics

"The contrivance would always fail to fail in its purpose"

2 26. Untitled

"The cloudy mirror of the pond"

2 27. First Guilt

"The child in the reefer coat"

2 28. The dispersal [7 pages]

"The ancient look of roofs in evening light"

2 29. Optional

[typed copy of #70 in first section]

2 30. Audience Dispersed

"World is no more a stage, nor we the players"

2 31. SIMON BUCKMINSTER (SR.):

"With rain boiling in the asphalt court"

2 32. Mr. Peacock the Germanist

"Where wit chose gravity to wed"

2 33. Untitled

"That June was a year ago"

2 34. PLAGUE FOR A MUSEUM - same as #9
2 35. Gardenparty

"When Sunday breezes fan, and sky"

2 36. Sonnet on the disappointment over the garden party for the TSO spoiled by bad weather

"When full sun and incipient foliage"

2 37. Untitled

"What does this smell of burnt cork cenote" [sic]

2 38. Untitled

"Underneath the pavement, even"

2 39. Untitled

"What castle hides this L-shaped drawing-room"

2 40. It is like a sickness

"Well then, I am sick; it is like a sickness"

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II SUMMER '36 - 1939-40
BoxFolder
12 1. Untitled

"Thin stands the sapling"

2 2. The Hanging of Steven [19 pages]

"They would say: 'That was a curious dream.'"

2 3. Untitled

"They roll down the cliffs and into the sea"

2 4. SCRAP DURING A DULL LECTURE

"We would experiment with Death" [poem crossed out]

2 5. They did not choose...

"They did not choose that they will not relinquish"

2 6. Untitled [5 pages]

"These girls laugh easily"

2 7. Untitled

"The waxen hands that lift and bear away"

2 8. Morning Piece

"There were seven stars in the morning sky"

2 9. Plaque for a Museum

"There is an inland river"

2 10. Untitled

"The woman mouthing hymns can understand"

2 11. Untitled

"The sky is not a drought for us"

2 12. The simple horizontal [ The Book of Canadian Poetry . Ed. A.J.M. Smith. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1943, p.428.]

"The simple horizontal

Is a lie dull eyes create"

2 13. Geography of the secret

"The places where things grow"

2 14. A moral tale

"The pantrymaid that chopped the chives"

2 15. Untitled

"The rainsweet grey of this forgotten morning"

2 16. The Spending of the Seed [originally, No Graven Image]

"The mourning murderer-sweetheart now"

2 17. August Afternoon

"The long striped afternoon moves carelessly"

2 18. Untitled

"Gregory was handsome in a tweed sort of way"

2 19. Untitled

"I woke to find my body" [poem crossed out]

2 20. The foghorn...

"The foghorn like a grey stone wall"

2 21. Coda and variations

"The evening ended with a game of dominoes"

2 22. GEOMETAPHYSICS [ Poetry [Chicago], 70 (Sept. 1947), pp.318-19.]

"The earth was once a circle-stage"

2 23. Yarely then

"The doom we now invoke"

2 24. The iconoclasts [ Ibid ., pp.319-20]

"The dervish dancer on the smoking steppes"

2 25. Reflection on Art, Industry, and Politics

"The contrivance would always fail to fail in its purpose"

2 26. Untitled

"The cloudy mirror of the pond"

2 27. First Guilt

"The child in the reefer coat"

2 28. The dispersal [7 pages]

"The ancient look of roofs in evening light"

2 29. Optional

[typed copy of #70 in first section]

2 30. Audience Dispersed

"World is no more a stage, nor we the players"

2 31. SIMON BUCKMINSTER (SR.):

"With rain boiling in the asphalt court"

2 32. Mr. Peacock the Germanist

"Where wit chose gravity to wed"

2 33. Untitled

"That June was a year ago"

2 34. PLAGUE FOR A MUSEUM - same as #9
2 35. Gardenparty

"When Sunday breezes fan, and sky"

2 36. Sonnet on the disappointment over the garden party for the TSO spoiled by bad weather

"When full sun and incipient foliage"

2 37. Untitled

"What does this smell of burnt cork cenote" [sic]

2 38. Untitled

"Underneath the pavement, even"

2 39. Untitled

"What castle hides this L-shaped drawing-room"

2 40. It is like a sickness

"Well then, I am sick; it is like a sickness"

2 41. WE WHO WALK

"We who walk the bald earth"

2 42. Untitled

"We move in rhythm, being in the image of God"

2 43. The road

"Turn off the road Mister"

3 44. MANLEY BUCKMINSTER) [sic]:

"Tudor is my brother.

Tudor is a thief."

3 45. August

"To go out on the hills on a cloudy mid-August midmorning"

3 46. Untitled

"To tell what is from what appears"

3 47. Untitled [p.3 - pp.1 & 2 missing]

"Through station corridors and waiting rooms"

3 48. Untitled

"Through the long night the fog-horn sounded"

3 49. Untitled

"This is a year Like great stone pillars bare against a blind white sky."

3 50. City of April

"This is about me, and you must listen -

You who sit naked on the bed, folding your hands about your toes"

3 51. Untitled

"This is a year" [revision of #49]

3 52. THIN ELEMENTAL [poem crossed out]

"Like forty raw spy-apples bulging a hamper"

3 53. Untitled

"A dog's bark like a biscuit broken"

3 54. SEPTEMBER 1939 [written in May '39]

"A plane drones high in the stillness"

3 55. Untitled

"at a nicked counter"

3 56. Egotist

"And all this out of tune"

3 57. The Woodcutter's Wife: A Lament

"A wall of fair blue ocean curls to sever"

3 58. April Afternoon

"A stained horizon and a loony lift"

3 59. The shadow is the soul

"Adam felt himself a summit of organpipes"

3 60. Untitled

"A prairie house is made of wood"

3 61. Untitled

"Barber barber cull my tresses

From apocalyptic stresses"

3 62. Untitled

"Four legs marching eight arms swinging"

3 63. After due process

"Fountain, plash me under"

3 64. Untitled

"For words once uttered make of honesty"

3 65. Untitled

"For to us blazing little mites"

3 66. AN ALMOST-ANGLICAN TEMPER

"For if I must select a single acre"

3 67. OCTOBER

"Flim-flam moon-pitted wind-smitten slit-slat-leaf-whortled"

3 68. GATINEAU [c.f Guatineau, #54 in first section where it is handwritten on a slip inserted in the scrap book. Here the poem is typed and crossed out.]
3 69. Pieces for the dictionary... (GLOSSARY IN A MINOR)

"ECSTATIC: Faraday in bicycle-slips in a (blip) cinder lane"

3 70. Untitled

"God knows I

Cannot condemn

Her for her tarnished

diadem."

3 71. JULY 3

"Earth turning brown once more into the shadows"

3 72. Untitled

"Earth heaved and spewed me up"

3 73. Untitled

"Dimness of tangles underbrush burned deep"

3 74. Untitled

"Did you admit to appalling myopeia?" [sic]

3 75. Centrifugue

"Delicately, step delicately"

3 76. Politics in prosody: a riddle

"Decisive (amphibrach) I strode to sea"

3 77. There, and Here

"Day is an eye -- but there --"

3 78. MODERN MINOTAUR

"Cretans of aftertime"

3 79. Untitled

"Did it hurt to die Bertel"

3 80. To the Adman

"By visual design"

3 81. Abest

"Blonde like a little dutchcut child"

3 82. Untitled

"Bitter bitter is the kernel"

3 83. KNOW EACH OTHER? WHY WE PLAYED OYSTER SAILS ON THE SAME BLOCK SUMMER EVENINGS

"Barrel staves and Damascus skins"

3 84. Untitled

"Because it snowed transparent April snow"

3 85. Untitled

"At the mould-green hour of night"

3 86. Untitled [poem crossed out]

"There used to be a margin on my clock"

3 87. WHEREIN GOD IS PLURAL

"How did we get in prison"

3 88. Untitled

"There is a tide that flows"

3 89. CIVILIAN

"I came on a spare corner in time"

3 90. MARIA MINOR [ The Book of Canadian Poetry , p.428.]

"I conceived. And Sorrow"

3 91. Untitled

"I dreamed a dream of Bethlehem"

3 92. Untitled

"I have seen the snow fall" [followed by a revision]

4 93. Untitled

"I sat on the little wooden wharf"

4 94. Untitled [recent insert]

"If this aery globe were a melon"

4 95. Untitled

"If we had grace to fear All Hallow's Eve"

4 96. To a thickset five o'clock stranger

"If, in a scarf light as a swallow's flight"

4 97. Untitled

"(tense) I would speak one preposterous Word"

4 98. Untitled

"I saw one walking out tonight"

4 99. BALLAD FOR CANADIANS

"He wore a red shirt and a Burberry coat"

4 100. Untitled

"He who could define truth"

4 101. PREDESTINATION

"He is a simple man in a blue shirt"

4 102. Untitled

"He came with a bustle, announcing the holiday"

4 103. Untitled

"Hay foot straw foot"

4 104. Noah

"Had Noah seen himself as casual flotsam"

4 105. "FROM FAR AWAY WE USED TO HEAR IT"

"From far away we used to hear it (Ulula in desolate rainy places)"

4 106. Untitled

"Round us the crazyslanting forest"

4 107. Untitled

"Sawdust in a pool of sun"

4 108. Untitled

"From a wire construct"

4 109. Toronto Sunday

"From this back window where the sun is fanned"

4 110. Sky

"Such sky, in one brief dim of day --"

4 111. Crisis

"So we turn in the middle air together"

4 112. Untitled

"So in this glass-clear dawn"

4 113. Three views on the unfortunate survivor

"'See, it is broken,' said Martin"

4 114. Apocalyptic

"Round the helix of the ear"

4 115. Untitled

"Remember that girl in Glasgow Montana"

4 116. Remember, on waking

"Remember, on waking"

4 117. BRIGHT MOMENT OF DEATH

"Poor child. She was too old for this"

4 118. Snow in December and in March

"One kind of shovelling you hear"

4 119. "IN THE HOLY NAME BANG BANG"

"Out of the swamp he came"

4 120. Untitled

"Ours was a forlorn grassy country"

4 121. Untitled [poem crossed out]

"Where the tree grew ground was hard"

4 122. Lament for a friend

"One blanched almond evening"

4 123. Sea-Light

"Old Chaos or Noel, who rules tonight?"

4 124. Untitled

"O in the city at midnight"

4 125. Valleys and Shadows

"My daughter is asleep, though still the evening"

4 126. MUTABLE HEARTS

"Now with a rush the children of men"

4 127. Spanish sequence

"Night was ablaze along the shore"

4 128. Sadness

"My heart is open, like a disused barn"

4 129. Untitled [on back of page is handwritten original of MARIA MINOR, #90]

"Like lean dull-Golden tigresses"

4 130. Complete

"The medieval town was walled"

4 131. THE SUN AND THE STRANGER

"In the bare back room with its three small tables"

4 132. The Tenants

"In the October moonlight"

4 133. Crow and Willow

"It startles you like Iceland poppies"

4 134. Untitled

"It is ill to cry with emptiness"

4 135. Norah talking to Mauber [sp ?], the night they became engaged [originally: a young woman talking to a young man the night they become engaged]

"In the glassed porch"

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III. 1939-40 to 1952
BoxFolder
21 1. Untitled

"The Mortimer Snerds we went to High school with"

1 2. Untitled

"The grassy amphitheatre only stirs"

1 3. The flying fish [originally: WHIFFLE]

"The flying fish"

1 4. UPON NOT MEETING A GARGOYLE [poem crossed out]

"The yellow cobbles in a clammy sweat"

1 5. To an American poet

"The creaming crashing ocean, to your left"

1 6. The Local and the Lakefront [Origin, Ser.2, No.4 (Jan. 1962), pp.3-4.]

"The crankle can occur"

1 7. The cold blowing

"The cold blowing of March in the oaks"

1 8. The lover's lament

"The cell inviolate eschews"

1 9. A disgruntled employee enjoys disposing of rivals before enjoying time off with a friend.

"'The boy with the brilliant promise"

1 10. Uses of trees

"The apple's stem"

1 11. To Gunther American Zone Germany (1953)

"Three holes in an old shutter"

1 12. Stone over Friday or Poem with a bad word in it

"Those who meet"

1 13. Untitled

"Through the bakery window"

1 14. The Day of MacB--'s Funeral

"This must be very exact - far more exact"

1 15. MEDIA

"This we have compassed. The remaining days"

1 16. Changeable Times

"This morning were you struck with admiration"

1 17. EPISTLE [7 pages, May 25, 1950]

"This is an application for assistance"

1 18. Untitled

"This eggshape you conceived God"

1 19. Untitled

"These are all in a way acquaintances"

1 20. After a conversation (Emma Goldman)

"This Emma who brewed wieners for a crew"

1 21. In October

"This is the season when along the walks"

1 22. A Frontier

"There are some hurts young trees cannot survive"

1 23. Untitled

"The standing guests, a grotesque glade"

1 24. Hubris (Instead of Euthanasia, War, Birth-Control Suicide, Capital Punishment, Genocide, etc.)

"The universe is,

Yes, a Making."

1 25. Untitled [3 pages]

"The portrait gallery, as we entered it"

1 26. Reflective March

"The sodden mat of last year's grass"

1 27. Untitled

"The square stone tower, its flagpole towards one corner"

1 28. Election

"The poll clerk had a hat"

1 29. p.m. and a.m.

"The mother in an evening"

1 30. "By indirection find Direction out..."

"(in lieu of a reply to the questionnaire sent out by the editors of Direction on February 10, 1946.")

1 31. Thirst is Strangeness

"With bridled passion the beginning spring"

1 32. Untitled

"You make a pennant of their sorrow"

1 33. Trilling's Comment

"Who could have dreamed the dream men inhabit?"

1 34. May Evening 1945

"When the tallow candles of mourning felt the air"

1 35. Untitled

"You know how the lilac-coloured evening"

1 36. Bourne and the Womb

"When the mountains of rock are swung to sun"

1 37. Net Working

"When he reached me the fishy glove"

2 38. The Spheres

"When I am deep in hate I do not murder"

2 39. Untitled

"What is the office of the seventh hour?"

2 40. Time: enemy of new friendships

"Two strangers met in child-light"

2 41. Untitled

"What a buffoon in small am I"

2 42. Valid Views of Rimbaud's Africk Years as Clefs aux Personnes

"To go out, to find"

2 43. Youth : Age

"Tides suck up simmering miles"

2 44. History

"Through the visor of one of the"

2 45. The Institution

"Look to see the impossible favourites"

2 46. The desolate castellan calls for a minstrel [June 13, 1950]

"A swollen foot and a hungry paunch"

2 47. Untitled

"A soiled white dog and a soiled white stone"

2 48. Untitled

"A sad thing happened tonight"

2 49. Midsummer

"A Persian moon that rises from a book"

2 50. Interaction

"A kite snags on"

2 51. Beddoes

"A chemist, Englishman, doctor, in a"

2 52. THOUGHTS IN A PISCAL OBSCURITY

"In the days when there was snow"

2 53. TRAVEL [originally, PATRIOT (CANADIAN)]

"If you see them at the depots"

2 54. Untitled

"If you know what you've heard"

2 55. Untitled [CIIA - wartime - for Bobby Adamson who married Regmore Christophersome - sp?]

"I have at hand"

2 56. Riddle

"I bade you bet a Grecian sum"

2 57. Untitled

"I am ashamed at daybreak"

2 58. ((NOT the Kirklands))

"Here by the Gothic stone of the woollen mills"

2 59. the Rueful Pilgrim

"["I remember thee, the kindness of thy youth, the love of thine espousals, when thou wentest after me in the wilderness, in a land that was not sown."]"

2 60. THE PARTY

"He squares the windows of the rooms he walks in"

2 61. Biography

"Glamorgan in the Glee sang"

2 62. Centripetal

"Mount Ararat shows sombre browns and purples"

2 63. Untitled

"Man, in a dirty mackintosh"

2 64. Betrayal

"Morning shadows mark the rendezvous"

2 65. Untitled

"Meeting in some translucent medium"

2 66. Untitled

"Look - I give you the day"

2 67. Looking back on the Decisive Moment

"Like a throw of dice"

2 68. Untitled

"Life in a mousehole"

2 69. The coward

"Leaving the warm confusion of the company"

2 70. Untitled

"It doesn't matter whether it's a warehouse"

2 71. The show fear

"In this office we are few"

2 72. Love

"In the psyche"

2 73. Italian littoral

"One morning, from the tallow of"

3 74. One man, and one stone wall, and one cracked cranium... [unclear if this is the title or the first line]

"Don't let me say it that way"

3 75. Untitled

"O you who stand among the twisting trees"

3 76. Change

"Now, the late summer passed, few revellers"

3 77. Untitled

"Now that the wind blows"

3 78. After Bomb News

"Now that the sun is fair, and green"

3 79. December Difference

"Now, at this quiet moment, when the pale moon"

3 80. Untitled

"My spirits could be fused in this hard sun"

3 81. Untitled

"Put up a bronze monument of pity"

3 82. Untitled

"Suppose a parasitic vine"

3 83. Untitled

"Sweet sir, your songs are excellent"

3 84. Untitled

"So many person here so well-behaved"

3 85. NOR CURTAIN FALLS NOR ANY LIGHTS ARE DIMMED...

"Since you and I loosed our reluctant hands"

3 86. Rattling Chains

"Reading the paper is moral."

3 87. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

"Rain is a general thing, and a wet thing"

3 88. Chrysales

"Out of the noon of their day two have turned pilgrim"

3 89. Social Order

"Out of the velvet dust"

3 90. This is the Way the Joke Dissolves (in Cycles)

"Open the books there. Inter in my credit"

3 91. Eliot and Pound

"Only moonshape ponderously adrift"

3 92. TSE (when EP was insanitized)

"Who walks not humbly with his God" [#92 is a typed revision of #91]

3 93. Quietness

"Far out the humming night"

3 94. Isolation etude

"Everything else tonight has turned"

3 95. Fabulous architects

"Earth's knuckled temples and curled horns they probed"

3 96. Comment on Sept/45 at Simcoe Hall and a Question

"Dank straw, stray branches caked in mud"

3 97. THE STORY OF DISCOVERY

"Champlain sailed to Canada"

3 98. THE STORY OF EXPLORATION [stapled to #97]

"La Salle (Re'ne' Robert Cavalier Sieur de)"

3 99. The World, the Flesh [written in pencil in corner]

"Buffalo kills lit up"

3 100. Lights on exile

"Both of us, I would guess, but certainly I"

3 101. Loose Ends (1940)

"Blue sky, yellow sky, green sky, black"

3 102. A CHOPIN RECORDING

"Birch leaves, leaves of the blackthorn basswood"

3 103. Winged Chariot

"Beauty wooed Virtue. (Virtue had flirted first.)"

3 104. A University Clerk responds to the Addresses of the University Job Evaluator

"As the rites of Efficiency demand" [late 1940's - marginal comments by author]

3 105. The chain

"Are our desert visionaries"

3 106. Untitled

"About that rain that falls"

3 107. Tentative hour

"Air swollen with damp, and trees"

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IV. 1953 to January, 1963
BoxFolder
31 1. Untitled

"Who goes there and where was I" [recent insert?]

1 2. Untitled

"When once a year"

1 3. Back to school: A Dream

"When you have been grown up for fifteen years"

1 4. HOLIDAY PLANS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY [ Poetry of Mid-Century 1940-60 . Ed. Milton Wilson. New Canadian Library Original, No.4. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1964, p.110.]

"When daylight is broad"

1 5. In being

"What is this clear well-spring of terror?"

1 6. Untitled

"Toronto is runged with" [sic]

1 7. Untitled [same page as #6]

"The enbloc [sp?] overbearingly generalistic"

1 8. Women's waiting-room

"Three station matrons dressed in white"

1 9. The typographer's ornate symbol at the end of a chapter or a story [Origin, Ser.2, No.4 (Jan. 1962), pp.14-15]

"This is another time"

1 10. Range and Precision [originally: Campaign Speech]

"There is to find a spring"

1 11. JERUSALEM TO JERICHO or: U.S. CITIZEN IN THE ORIENT

"Thieves in the kitchen"

1 12. Reverse Pygmalion

"There is much comfort on a map"

1 13. Untitled

"There is a sky of grass-roots"

1 14. To Mr. Swinburne

"The vial of springtime has broken in gold"

1 15. Walking trip

"The road was coming to a sharp hill"

1 16. Trees and Clearings

"The rain-stroked air with leaf-dye"

1 17. Plaque for a Medical Arts Waiting Room

"The peanut shells are silted over"

[a number of revisions made to this poem]

1 18. Prism and privacy

"The mountain lion, when his leg is broken"

1 19. The Desolate Place

"The love of God I know about"

1 20. Untitled fragment [the "Beginning of a Story"]

"The little silver basins tremble"

1 21. Adam and the Orchard

"The genial moralist, aware"

1 22. UNSEASONED [Originally: CHANGE HAS NEW MEANING NOW / And for a mortal creature / one season may be all the change he sees.]

"The break-up finds" ["Eli Mandel" written in corner of page]

1 23. To a Period [Origin, Ser.2, No.4 (Jan. 1962), pp.12-13.]

"The bird pheasant"

1 24. Untitled

"The ancient echoing, vaulted dynasties"

1 25. Span [Feb. 1955]

"Butcher lurks"

1 26. Streetcar [Ibid., pp.6-7]

"Bundled up in"

1 27. HOT APRIL

"Blue-bright"

1 28. TRUST REWARDED: for Kenneth Yukich

"The crud and crust and scale"

1 29. Pity for Mayors and all of us

"At the mayor's meeting men from the other cities"

1 30. To the Young Perceiver, the Ultimate Receiver

"Brooding boy in the windowseat"

1 31. Untitled

"Art is the incarnation of the secret"

1 32. Untitled

"A small round sky, as silken to the eye"

1 33. Scenes for Cinerama

"Anne had a wristwatch on her arm"

1 34. To Jacques Ellul [BliwOintment [Vancouver], 5, No.1 (Jan. 1967), n.pag.]

"A junk truck stopped"

1 35. Parabaltic

"A wind like this if trees were rich in green"

1 36. A CAMPAIGN SPEECH IN CANADA IN 1989 [written in 1959]

"After the years of bomb and boon, the years when nobody stayed home ...."

[an essay in prose - 6 pages; in verse - 9 pages]

1 37. Without a hey nonny [originally, AETAS]

"A poet gave a seminar"

1 38. To F.R.S.

"A couple of stained-glass figures"

1 39. From the street level

"If pears were small and perfect things"

1 40. Untitled

"If all who wore the finest tailored silks"

1 41. The opening of Parliament Ceremonies, Snowy Day

"I just came sheepily out of the subway (or sheep-dip)"

1 42. DIFFERENT GENERATION

"I helf!" [sic]

1 43. I Can't Read Poetry

"I can't read poetry"

1 44. Rough version of #41
2 45. [A letter of "Eleanor" on Sat, Sept. 22 [year?] to tell her of a move to 34 East Elm Street]

"Here sundown is the curfew"

2 46. [Attached to #45 - notes to that poem] Rooming house no. 2 (34 E.Elm St.)

"Unhappy ladies laughing in the hall"

2 47. Diminuendo [Origin, Ser.2, No.4 (Jan., 1962), pp.17-18.]

"How for joy Mr. Jollyben cried"

2 48. Toronto Sunday [cf. #109 in section II where the same poem is typed on fragile old paper]

"From this back window where the sun is fanned"

2 49. For of such ...

"For of such as Henry Madore is"

2 50. The Beggars are Coming?

"Here, absolutely alone"

2 51. To a man who is resigned

"Candlemas pallour makes your presence thin"

2 52. Grammatical Conundrum; OR First Person Plural or No Person Singular

"Light from the star who gives us"

2 53. Winter Evening

"Invisible vermillion of the winter"

2 54. To Kenneth Yukich

"Kenneth, wind-soaked and sky-tethering man"

2 55. I think I thought I knew

"I've read maps and maps and guidebooks"

2 56. A leaf

"It takes a leaf to hold still: green"

2 57. Saturday train

"In furs, or with cigars"

2 58. Words Preliminary to Contact (Barriers Rise and Fall)

"If you can hear me"

2 59. To some poets

"If taking all its pastness from the future"

2 60. We Discussed the Modern

"Jumble-writers have to be"

2 61. Paul Celan

"On the one, the"

2 62. Untitled

"No longer empty-handed am"

2 63. September 21

"Mythology and methyl alcohol"

2 64. CHESTNUT TREE THREE STOREYS UP [ Poetry 62. Ed. Eli Mandel and Jean-Guy Pilon. Toronto: Ryerson, 1961, pp. 10-11]

"May:angels abiding in the sky loft"

2 65. Trireme, Jet, ______.

"Marching over the hills"

2 66. Untitled

"Madness you call it"

2 67. THE STREET THINKS:

"Looping shadows about, at 3 p.m."

2 68. Revolution

"Like a twister - the old maelstrom"

2 69. The seventh day of rain

"Singled out for desolation"

2 70. Towards the End of Daylight Saving Time [title revised]

"Summer had been so timeless"

2 71. [Title unclear - "Simon" is written in top left corner]

"Since I was suckled"

2 72. Lake Michigan [originally, Eftsoons]

"Sere vineyards of sparrows"

2 73. Tri-ballad cycle:

Cold Spring "Said the tulips to the snowbank"

Northern Picnic "Up the speckled paper cup"

Sam'l Becket cycles in "The snowbank isn't speaking"

2 74. HOT JUNE [ The Canadian Forum , March, 1963, pp. 286. Dumb; WS/D.]

"People are pink-cheekt only"

2 75. CANADA

"River miles wide"

2 76. Latter-day saint

"One manifest marvel"

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V. SINCE JANUARY 4, 1963
BoxFolder
33 1. Tinted nutmeg

"With perfect propriety speak of"

3 2. Your term is "Rest"* [Matt.11:29]

"When you'd have me have your yoke"

3 3. Christmas 1972

"When the Word"

3 4. Credo, & Hymn to the Blessed Virgin

"There is an inseparably"

3 5. The Comprehending Source [originally, The Enveloping Source]

"There is a household ahum"

3 6. Giving seemed losing - to us!

"The ulalume, remote"

3 7. PART OF A DEBATE [ Crux , Fall 1972, p.17]

"Q. The incarnation gives"

3 8. THINKING BACK [Acta Victoriana [ Centennial 1878-1978], 1002, No.2 (Fall 1978), p.42.]

"The bitter wet-leaf smell, darkening windows"

3 9. WAITING II

"The alien invading prince"

3 10. Sea suds

"What wedge is will, or why"

3 11. THE REVOLUTIONARY; or BETRAYAL AT THE TABLE

" I: The Thoughts The crew-in-exile, call it, or" [3 sections in the poem, 6 pages. Handwritten original is attached]

3 12. Fashion [March 12 / 65]

"That was the year"

3 13. Is. 57. 18: "I have seen his ways, and will heal him."

"These hands that hold the book"

3 14. To John Lee

"Your speech (spit teeth ah flow of breath)"

3 15. And the world was there

"...The telephone in the hall said no dialling and sure enough no office heard"

3 16. POLLY FLECK [fragments and rough work]

"The otherbodies' versions"

3 17. PALE SKY, PURE MORNING

"The only heir goes into the worst"

3 18. Untitled

"The life emblazoned"

3 19. Untitled page with fragments of writing

"The indigo-green flow of wind"

3 20. Escape and Return

"From a wire construct"

[cf. #108 in section II. This poem is a typed revision of that done in the late thirties.]

3 21. Community

"Father, gather us together"

3 22. Untitled [June 11 / 76]

"Fear"

3 23. FEAR

"Fear? Most, of being destroyed"

3 24. Untitled

"God is the only answer"

3 25. Carol

"God came where we are"

3 26. What is 'Praise'

"child in satin sand & swarming"

3 27. Untitled

"Canvas of a Spenser - scene"

3 28. Hymn [originally, "IN OUR BEST INTERESTS"]

"Comforter, strength of Christ"

3 29. Lament

"Empty arms"

3 30. Hymn: Remembering Mr. H.H. Kent

"A waxen life in"

3 31. Hymn of Unity Psalm 133

"Behold how good how pleasant"

4 32. CATALYSIS

"Because he came down into it"

4 33. Plaque for a library

"If I might be so cavalier"

4 34. Christmas

"I want to see the wagons in the wood"

4 35. ELEVATORS

"I saw ten women walk into a wall"

4 36. Love

"I saw a joy that sighs and grieves"

4 37. Nexus

"I let my husband die of drink"

4 38. Untitled

"I pray"

4 39. 'NO MAN COMETH...BUT BY ME'

"How many ways we have"

4 40. Ps. 36. 9: "For with thee is the fountain of life."

"Holy Lord Jesus"

4 41. No Nuke Spook on this Bright Day (On May 1, 1986, Expo. was to open, and just before the Day, there was a nuclear accident at Chernobyl.)

"How we insisted on success"

4 42. Worker's Conference

"On a grassy slope"

4 43. Untitled

"My Presencing Lord"

4 44. The Blindfold Christ

"My face they cover, mortal though divine"

[Included is a copy of Herbert's, "The Sacrifice," model for this poem.]

4 45. A PRAYER TO BE ALIVE IN WITNESS

"Let the badge be no invitation"

4 46. Towards the waker's house

"LEARNING is a step in the dark whether"

4 47. POEM FOR MUSIC

"Jesus"

4 48. In Straits* [*Ps. a5: 1b]

"In the sudden sweep"

4 49. To Mary Anne Voelkel (August 1988)

"In the Garden of His love"

4 50. For Those who come to Harbourfront Readings

"'If only I could see the"

4 51. Ez. 34. 13

"We sing things singable"

4 52. [Torn page with fragments of verses]

4 53. Untitled

"You, Lord, who opened all your heart"

4 54. Untitled

"O Holy Word" [On back of #52]

4 55. The Sourceful

"May 27, p.m. There was an ocean of blessed forgetfulness"

4 56. BEING TAUGHT ACTION

"Turned off the TV New"

4 57. Luke 15 ["The way to the way" written in top corner]

"There was a jolting"

4 58. Untitled [An early draft of "The Circuit" in sun , p.55.]

"The circuit of the Son"

4 59. Promise

"The caring of God"

4 60. Coda

"The breather of life"

4 61. For Professor Endicott

"...snuffing the magical air"

4 62. Sky

"Sky prune-dark, and suddenly"

4 63. Untitled

"Show me myself so

4 64. For Anna del Junco

"She is young. She looks across"

4 65. Agnostic Hymn

"Seal me"

4 66. Conformists Who Would Be Conformed [originally: AFTER-DISTRESS AFTER WEDNESDAY'S PRAYER, CONTINUED...A PRAYER]

"Sometimes the warp is off" [March 18, 1976]

4 67. Fusion point

"Reading takes in out"

4 68. Poor?

"'Poverty Press?"

4 69. The Sacrament

"One person, in death, removes"

4 69. The Sacrament

"One person, in death, removes"

4 71. Untitled

"Nothing I do or know or speak or feel"

4 72. The "Patient" as "Prophet"

"Not a mother, I too"

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VI. UNDATED & UNPUBLISHED POEMS [ca. 1970-1990].
BoxFolder
41 "Full Time Utopia"
1 "For of Such...."
1 "Self Mirrorings"
1 "Future", 1987.
1 "Pale Sky, Pure Morning"
1 "Priorities & Perspective"
1 "What John Saw"
1 "A Basis"
1 "Self Assertings"
1 "Levitcus too, in Time"
1 "Late Perspectives"
1 "Music was in the Wind"
1 "Potentiality"
1 "Late Perspective"
1 "How Open, Who are Compassed Here"
1 "Occassional Piece for Adele after Memorial Service for Debbie"

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VII. UNDATED & UNPUBLISHED ESSAYS [ca. 1970-1990].
BoxFolder
42 "Coming to Terms with Tolstoy"
3 "Poetry & Dukhobors"
3 "The Unpublished Manuscript of Margaret Avison:" Poems 1929-1989, Margaret Calverly, University of Toronto, 1990.
4 "Lighting up the Terrain": The Poetry of Margaret Avison , edited by David Kent, ECW Press, [ 1987. ]
5 Correspondence Re: Avison lectures on Christianity presented at University of Waterloo, 1992-1993. They form the basis of Avison's book A Kind of Perserverance , published in 1993.
6 Avison drafts & notes, [ [ca. 1987]. ]

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VIII. CORRESPONDENCE & DRAFTS FROM OTHER WRITERS 1985-1996
BoxFolder
47 Writings from Mia Anderson, [ca. 1990].
8 Writings from Mia Anderson, [ca. 1990].
9 Letters/writings from Jack Burman, 1991.
10 Letters/writings from Fred Cogswell, 1989.
11 Letters/writings Robert J. Gibbs, 1994.
12 Poems from Sybil Gordon, [ca. 1990].
13 Letter/writings from Catherine Hawley, 1992.
14 Letters/writings Sarah (Maggie) Helwig, 1985.
15 Writings from Agnes Kramer-Hamstra, 1989.
16 Letters/two manuscripts Denise Levertov, 1995.
17 Letters/writings Re: Professor John Margeson. 1995.
18 Letters/writings Stephen Andrew Ogden, 1996.
19 Letters/writings Erica Riggs, 1988-1991.
20 Letters/writings Annette Schalburg to David Kent about Avison.

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IX. LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE 1960-1995
BoxFolder
412 Literary Correspondence, A-B [ 1970-1995 ]

Ahmad, Igbal, 1970-1992.

Anderson, Mia, 1989-1990.

Anderson, Rod, 1990.

Ashton, Anne & Jeremy, [ca. 1990].

Balabanoff, Doreen, 1995.

Bassingthwaite, George, 1994.

Best, Jane, 1993.

Bissett, Bill, 1994.

Bluger, Marianne, 1994.

Boissonneau, Alice, 1991.

Bowering, George, 1995.

Buchholz, Garth, 1993.

Burbidge, John W., 1995.

Burge, John, 1990-1995.

22 LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE C 1960-1994

Cassanhgnago, Cristina, 1994.

Cogswell, Fred, 1978-1993.

Coleman, Glenn, 1982.

Corman, Cid, 1960-1962.

BoxFolder
51 LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE D-L 1981-1995

Deahl, James, 1995.

Denham, Robert D., 1994.

Donaldson, Jeffrey, 1994.

Dorsch, Audrey, 1992.

Ellis, Keith, 1989.

Gatenby, Greg, 1995.

Gillis, Roma-Lynn, 1994.

Gray, Elizabeth, 1981.

Grimshaw, David, 1989.

2 LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE H-L 1990-1995

Hancock, Maxine, 1990-1995.

Hay, Elizabeth, 1993.

Hirsch, Edward, 1990-1991.

Humphreys, Helen, 1992.

Kent, David, 1986-1991.

Klein, Florence L., 1991.

Kouhi, Elizabeth, 1994.

LaRocque, Judith A., 1992.

Lane, Travis, 1990-1993.

Lee, John B., 1991.

Lilburn, Tim, 1992-1995.

3 LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE M-N 1987-1994

Macpherson, Jay, 1991-1994.

MacQueen, A.J., 1994.

Margeson, D., 1992.

Maud, Ralph, 1994.

Mazoff, C. David, 1988-1990.

Meissner, Janosz, 1993.

New, W.H., 1987-1988.

Newman, Peter, 1992.

Nims, John F., 1988-1993.

4 LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE O-R 1988-1995

Ogden, Stephen, 1995.

Polidori, Josiane, 1990-1991.

Pope, Janet, 1991.

Purdy, Al, 1991.

Rapaport, Janis, 1995.

Rayside, David M., 1994.

Redd, Ruby, 1987-1988.

Remski, Matthew, 1992.

5 LITERARY CORRESPONDENCE S-Y 1988-1995

Scobie, Stephen, 1993-1994.

Sharp, Dorothy, 1995.

Staines, D., 1992-1994.

Strachan, Larry, 1993.

Solway, David, 1992.

Terpstra, John, 1991.

Thibaudeau, Colleen, 1988.

Vanderlip, Brian, 1989-1991.

Verity, Valerie, 1991.

Vicari, E.P., 1991-1994.

Yeo, Marg, 1991-1995, (includes some poems).

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X. MATERIAL RELATING TO FREDRICK BOCK 1957-1995
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56 Bock correspondence with Avison, 1957-1961
7 Bock correspondence with Avison, 1962-1969.
8 Bock correspondence with Avison, 1970-1980.
9 Anne Peyton correspondence with Avison, Re: Bock, 1984.
10 Drafts from Bock poems, [ca. 1960-1970].
11 Crag Beach , author's copy of an unpublished Bock collection of poems. (many poems previously published in various literary journals).
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61 Bock poems in "Great River Review", volume 1, 1977.
2 Two versions of an unpublished collection of Bock's poems The No Go of First Thing , 1969.
3 Unpublished collection of Bock's poems, The Mountains of Odds Come Even , 1969.
4 Listing of Margaret Avison holdings at York University Archives, 1984.
5 Correspondence & inventories from York University Archives, 1990-1995.

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XI. THESES ABOUT MARGARET AVISON 1986-1994
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66 "Thematic & Linguistic Aspects in the Poetry of Margaret Avison" Thesis: Cristina Cassanhgnago, Universita Cattolica Del Sacre Cuore di Milano, [ 1994-1995. ]
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71 "The Poetry of Margaret Avison" Thesis: Judith Ann Dudar, Dalhousie University, 1986.
2 Passage tidoscrift for litteratur og kritik , 1995.

A book in Danish with a translated article by Stephen Ogden quoting Avison's works.

3 sunblue , a musical score by John Burghe adapting three Avison poems to music, 1987-1990.

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