________________ CM . . . . Volume XII Number 21 . . . . June 23, 2006

cover

The Starrigans of Little Brook Bottom.

Harold Davis. Illustrated by Dana Carter.
St. John's, NL: Tuckamore Books, 2005.
182 pp., pbk., $13.95.
ISBN 1-894294-85-8.

Subject Headings:
Fairies-Juvenile fiction.
Missing children-Juvenile fiction.


Grades 7-9 / Ages 12-14.

Review by Jean Nickel.

**½ /4

excerpt:

Down through the centuries starrigans had always taken care not to be seen by humans, but in spite of their wariness, they were not always successful. Once Krab himself was careless. It happened during a howling storm three winters earlier.

 
Thus begins the story of the starrigans' involvement in the lives of the humans at Pinchgut. Krab was seen by Michael who was on his way home through a blizzard. Michael asked that his wife, Jenny, be kept safe during the birthing procedure. When he arrived home, he found his wife in trouble, and Krab rushed home to Little Brook Bottom to get help for her. This act of kindness involved saving the baby, and Penney's life becomes intertwined with the starrigans.

     One day, another group of little people called the crunnocks see Penney playing in the yard and, for some fun, they lead her away from her home. This action is seen by Krab and results in Penney's being saved by the starrigans. Then the problem arises on how to get her home without being seen by the humans or getting themselves caught by the crunnocks. The community comes out in full force to search for Penney, thereby making the task of returning her much more difficult. This situation results in some humorous incidents.

     This story talks about community and the coming together of people in adverse times. It is a good tale about the little people called the starrigans and the crannocks and the mistrust that can result because of misunderstandings between groups that are different.

     Students who enjoy fantasy will find this a good read, especially if they like the stories about elves, fairies, etc. It also gives students an idea of what life was like about a hundred years ago and the hardships that were involved for early settlers.

     Harold Davis grew up in Newfoundland. He and his wife live by the Salmonier River along with their three children.


Recommended.

Jean Nickel is a library technician at the Westglen School in Didsbury, AB.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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