________________ CM . . . . Volume VIII Number 16 . . . . April 12, 2002

cover Bake and Make Amazing Cakes. (Kids Can Do It).

Elizabeth MacLeod. Illustrated by June Bradford.
Toronto, ON: Kids Can Press, 2001.
40 pp., pbk.& cl., $5.95 (pbk.), $14.95 (cl.).
ISBN 1-55074-848-3 (pbk.), ISBN 1-55074-849-1 (cl.).

Subject Heading:
Cake-Juvenile literature.

Grades 4-8 / Ages 9-13.

Review by Meredith MacKeen.

**** /4

excerpt:

Decorating Cakes

You can find candy, sprinkles, colored sugar and tinted icing at grocery stores, bulk food stores or cake-decorating stores. Choose candies with strong colours. Light coloured candies look best on dark icing and dark candies look good on light colored icing.

Melting Chocolate

Use melted chocolate chips or bars of semisweet or milk chocolate to decorate your cake. If you break the bars into small pieces, the chocolate will melt faster. Chocolate burns easily, so ask an adult to help you carefully melt it in a microwave of double boiler. Heat the chocolate just enough to melt it, then let it cool slightly before you use it. If the chocolate begins to harden before you are finished, melt it again.

Bake and Make Amazing Cakes includes 19 easy-to-do cake projects and decorating tips which are simple enough for children 10 and older to try on their own. The illustrations and the step-by- step instructions are very clear and make use of cake baked as conventional rectangles or circles. Suggestions for decorations with items such as candies or cookies and icing sugar are very attractive. The directions for cakes include shapes for the holidays/festivals as well as other creative shapes like tigers, school buses, castles, burgers and dinosaurs. Consequently, both genders of bakers should be attracted to the book. The book's closing pages contain recipes for various cakes, such as white, chocolate, carrot and banana, as well as recipes for icing. Bake and Make Amazing Cakes will certainly appeal to juvenile chefs and, who knows, the library staff may even benefit. The book also has a role in the mathematics program where geometry is introduced as all the fancier shapes are combinations of the triangles, rectangles and circles cut from the original circular or rectangular cakes. In schools where baking is part of the curriculum, this book will inspire bakers to new designs.

Highly recommended.

Meredith MacKeen is a teacher-Librarian at Glen Stewart School, in Stratford, PEI.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.

Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364

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