________________ CM . . . . Volume VIII Number 6 . . . . November 16, 2001

cover What's That Bug? Everyday Insects and their Really Cool Cousins. (Whatsthatbug 19 ).

Nan Froman. Illustrated by Julian Mulock.

Markham, ON: Scholastic Canada, 2001.
32 pp., cloth, $19.99.
ISBN 0-439-98788-1.

Subject Headings:
Insects-Juvenile literature.

Grades 3-5 / Ages 8-10.

Review by Gail Hamilton.

*** /4

excerpt:

Each species of firefly has its own light-flashing pattern. The females of some predatory species can imitate the flashing of another species, allowing them to attract male fireflies and then eat them. In tropical Asia, many fireflies - both male and female - will rest in a tree while the males flash their lights in sync, creating "firefly trees."

bugs

Creepy crawlies never looked so good! This book focuses on the fascinating insects which comprise nine of the most familiar orders of insects (there are 28 orders in all). In 1758, Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus created the system still used by entomologists to name and classify insects. The classifications are based on similarities between insects' body parts. Presented in chronological order from when they first were believed to have appeared on earth, these six-legged creatures are bound to capture the attention of readers. Beginning with dragonflies and damselflies, the book includes the jumpers (e.g. crickets); termites; the true bugs (50,000 in this group!); sapsuckers; beetles; butterflies and moths; flies and mosquitoes; and bees, wasps, hornets and ants. Though there is not enough information for a research project on any one bug, the book introduces each insect group in a few general paragraphs, followed by several examples with interesting facts.

    Huge, colourful illustrations, most of them larger-than-life, show the structural details of the insects' bodies. In addition, many of the bugs are shown in actual size alongside their magnified images. A wide black band appears across the top of the page to indicate each new insect group featured. The book's attractive and eye-catching layout entices readers. An index and a short list of recommended reading are provided.

Recommended.

Gail Hamilton is a teacher-librarian at Bird's Hill School in East St. Paul, MB.

 

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.

Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364

NEXT REVIEW |TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THIS ISSUE - November 16, 2001.

AUTHORS | TITLES | MEDIA REVIEWS | PROFILES | BACK ISSUES | SEARCH | CMARCHIVE | HOME